My CRAZY wild food challenge! Eating wild in November.

So I have been letting life get in the way of my foraging lately, so today I decided to challenge myself to eat at least 10 different wild plants today. Some times I think when I tell people that I am a forager they picture me as some crazy outdoorsman that crashes through the woods looking for rare plants. I do like spending time in the woods, but honestly most of the wild food I eat comes from lawns and woodland edges.

Well, I guess I set the bar too low on my challenge today, I found and ate these ten plants in ten minutes, without ever going more than 30 feet from my house. To be fair the last one is a woodland plant in an area that I scattered seed last fall. Maybe not such a CRAZY challenge after all. Edible wild plants are all around us, all we have to do is educate ourselves about how to recognize them, what parts are safe to eat, and how they need to be prepared.

So here is my challenge to you, how many of these plants do you recognize? Comment bellow!

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10

Thanks for reading,

Nate

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10 thoughts on “My CRAZY wild food challenge! Eating wild in November.

    1. I don’t know all these plants. But I do love eating greens from my yard. Today I cooked me up some Dock, lamb’s quarters and a little wild garlic then scrambled in 2 eggs and some seasoning and it was delicious. Yumm

  1. OK, here are the answers, remember that just because it is edible, doesn’t mean that the whole plant is edible.

    1. Common mallow
    2. Yellow Woodsorrel
    3. Smartweed
    4. Purple deadnettle
    5. Common chickweed
    6. Broadleaf dock
    7. Field garlic
    8. Garlic mustard
    9. Black nightshade
    10. Honewort

  2. I don´t recognize all of them, but mallow and plantain are highly anti-inflammatory and I have used them topically to alleviate nasty pains…it really works!
    I also eat some of the weeds from my garden, especially nettle which grows like crazy in my backyard…Nettle is being farmed here in Portugal because of it´s INCREDIBLE nutritional value, but obviously once MAN activates the GREED machine all NATURAL goodness will be lost!

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